Testing the installation

EVL comes with a series of tests you can run to make sure the core is performing correctly on your target system.

latmus: the litmus test for latency

  • With the sole -m option or without any argument, the latmus application runs a 1Khz sampling loop, collecting the min, max and average latency values obtained for an EVL thread running in user-space which responds to timer events. This is a basic latency benchmark which does not require any additional interrupt source beyond the on-chip hardware timer readily available to the kernel.

  • In addition, you can use this application to measure the response time of a thread running in user-space to external interrupts, specifically to GPIO events. This second call form is selected by the -Z and -z option switches.

  • Finally, passing -t starts a calibration of the EVL core timer, finding the best configuration values.

Unless you only plan to measure [in-band response time to GPIO events](), you will need CONFIG_EVL_LATMUS to be enabled in the kernel configuration to run the timer calibration or the [response to timer test](). This driver must be loaded into the kernel under test if you built it as a dynamic module. For those familiar with Xenomai 3, this program combines and extends the features of the latency and autotune utilities.

latmus accepts the following arguments, given as short or long option names:

  • -i --irq

    Collect latency figures or tune the EVL core timer from the context of an in-kernel interrupt handler.

  • -k --kernel

    Collect latency figures or tune the EVL core timer from the context of a kernel-based EVL thread.

  • -u --user

    Collect latency figures or tune the EVL core timer from the context of an EVL thread running in user-space. This is the default mode, in absence of -i and -k.

  • -r --reset

    Reset the gravity values of the EVL core timer to their factory defaults. These defaults are statically defined by the EVL platform code.

  • -q --quiet

    Tame down verbosity of the test to the bare minimum, only the final latency report will be issued when in effect. Passing this option requires a timeout to be set with the -T option.

  • -b --background

    Run the test in the shell’s background. All output is suppressed until the final latency report.

  • -K --keep-going

    Keep the execution going upon unexpected switch to in-band mode of the responder thread. Normally, any switch to in-band mode from the thread responding to timer/GPIO events would cause the execution to stop with an error message, since the latency figures would be tainted by a transition to the non real-time context. This option tells latmus to keep going regardless; it only makes sense for debugging purpose, when collecting latency figures from an EVL thread running in user-space (i.e. -u).

  • -m --measure

    Measure the response time to [timer events](). In addition to this option, -i, -k and -u select a specific measurement context, -u applies by default. Measurement of response time to timer events is the default mode, in absence of the -t, -Z and -z options on the command line.

  • -t --tune

    Run a core timer calibration procedure. -i, -k and -u can be used to select a specific tuning context, all of them are applied in sequence otherwise. See below. This option is mutually exclusive with -m, -Z and -z.

  • -p --period=<µsecs>

    Set the sampling period to <µsecs>. By default, 1000 is used (one tick every millisecond or 1Khz). The slowest sampling period is 1000000 (1Hz).

  • -T --timeout=<duration>[dhms]

    The duration of the test, excluding the one second warmup period. This option enables a timeout which stops the test automatically after the specified runtime has elapsed. By default, the test runs indefinitely, or until ^C is pressed. The duration is interpreted according to the modifier suffix, as a count of days, minutes, hours or seconds. In absence of modifier, seconds are assumed.

  • -A --maxlat-abort=<maxlat>

    Automatically abort the test whenever the max latency figure observed exceeds <maxlat>.

  • -v --verbose=<level>

    Set the verbosity level to <level>. Setting 0 is identical to entering quiet mode with -q. Any non-zero value is considered when tuning the EVL core timer (-t option), to control the amount of debug information the latmus companion driver sends to the kernel log. Defaults to 1, maximum is 2.

  • -l --lines=<count>

    Set the number of result lines per page. In measurement mode (-m), a new result header is output after every <count> result lines.

  • -g --plot=<file>

    Dump an histogram of the collected latency values to <file> in a format which is easily readable by the gnuplot utility.

  • -H --histogram=<cells>

    Set the number of cells in the histogram, each cell covers one microsecond of additional latency from 1 to <cells> microseconds. This value is used only if -g is given on the command line. Defaults to 200, covering up to 200 microseconds in worst-case latency, which should never be as high on any target platform with EVL.

  • -P --priority=<prio>

    Set the scheduling priority of the responder thread in the SCHED_FIFO class. This option only makes sense when collecting latency figures or tuning the EVL core timer from an EVL thread context (i.e. -u or -k). Defaults to 90.

  • -c --cpu=<nr>

    Set the CPU affinity of the responder thread. This option only makes sense when collecting latency figures or tuning the EVL core timer from an EVL thread context (i.e. -u or -k). Defaults to 0.

  • -Z --oob-gpio=<host>

    Start an out-of-band test measuring the [response time to GPIO events]() in out-of-band mode, i.e. relying on real-time capabilities of the EVL core. The argument is the host name or IPv4 addresses of the remote board which monitors the response time from the SUT running the latmus application. This option must be associated with -I and -O to specify the GPIO chip(s) and pin numbers to use.

  • -z --inband-gpio=<host>

    Start an in-band test measuring the [response time to GPIO events]() in plain in-band mode. The argument is the host name or IPv4 address of the remote board which monitors the response time from the SUT running the latmus application. This option must be associated with -I and -O to specify the GPIO chip(s) and pin numbers to use.

  • -I --gpio-in=<gpiochip-name>,<pin-number>[,rising-edge|falling-edge]

    Specify the GPIO chip and pin number to be used for receiving the [GPIO pulses]() from the remote monitor board. Optionally, you can select whether GPIO events should be triggered on the rising edge (default) or falling edges of GPIO signals. This option only makes sense whenever -Z or -z are present on the command line too.

  • -O --gpio-out=<gpiochip-name>,<pin-number>

    Specify the GPIO chip and pin number to be used for acknowledging the [GPIO pulses]() received from the monitor board. This option only makes sense whenever -Z or -z are present on the command line too.

  • If latmus fails starting with an Invalid argument error, double-check the CPU number passed to -c if given. The designated CPU must be part of the out-of-band CPU set known to the EVL core. Check this file /sys/devices/virtual/evl/control/cpus to know which CPUs are part of this set.

    hectic: hammering the EVL context switching machinery

    By default, the hectic program runs a truckload of EVL threads both in user and kernel spaces, for exercising the scheduler of the autonomous core. In addition, this test can specifically stress the floating-point management code to make sure the FPU is shared flawlessly between out-of-band and in-band thread contexts.

    To get this test running, you will need CONFIG_EVL_HECTIC to be enabled in the kernel configuration, and loaded into the kernel under test if you built it as a dynamic module.

    # /usr/evl/bin/hectic -s 200
    == Testing FPU check routines...
    == FPU check routines: OK.
    == Threads: switcher_ufps0-0 rtk0-1 rtk0-2 rtup0-3 rtup0-4 rtup_ufpp0-5 rtup_ufpp0-6 rtus0-7 rtus0-8 rtus_ufps0-9 rtus_ufps0-10 rtuo0-11 rtuo0-12 rtuo_ufpp0-13 rtuo_ufpp0-14 rtuo_ufps0-15 rtuo_ufps0-16 rtuo_ufpp_ufps0-17 rtuo_ufpp_ufps0-18 fpu_stress_ufps0-19 switcher_ufps1-0 rtk1-1 rtk1-2 rtup1-3 rtup1-4 rtup_ufpp1-5 rtup_ufpp1-6 rtus1-7 rtus1-8 rtus_ufps1-9 rtus_ufps1-10 rtuo1-11 rtuo1-12 rtuo_ufpp1-13 rtuo_ufpp1-14 rtuo_ufps1-15 rtuo_ufps1-16 rtuo_ufpp_ufps1-17 rtuo_ufpp_ufps1-18 fpu_stress_ufps1-19 switcher_ufps2-0 rtk2-1 rtk2-2 rtup2-3 rtup2-4 rtup_ufpp2-5 rtup_ufpp2-6 rtus2-7 rtus2-8 rtus_ufps2-9 rtus_ufps2-10 rtuo2-11 rtuo2-12 rtuo_ufpp2-13 rtuo_ufpp2-14 rtuo_ufps2-15 rtuo_ufps2-16 rtuo_ufpp_ufps2-17 rtuo_ufpp_ufps2-18 fpu_stress_ufps2-19 switcher_ufps3-0 rtk3-1 rtk3-2 rtup3-3 rtup3-4 rtup_ufpp3-5 rtup_ufpp3-6 rtus3-7 rtus3-8 rtus_ufps3-9 rtus_ufps3-10 rtuo3-11 rtuo3-12 rtuo_ufpp3-13 rtuo_ufpp3-14 rtuo_ufps3-15 rtuo_ufps3-16 rtuo_ufpp_ufps3-17 rtuo_ufpp_ufps3-18 fpu_stress_ufps3-19
    RTT|  00:00:01
    RTH|---------cpu|ctx switches|-------total
    RTD|           0|         568|         568
    RTD|           3|         853|         853
    RTD|           2|         739|         739
    RTD|           1|         796|         796
    RTD|           0|         627|        1195
    RTD|           2|        1258|        1997
    RTD|           3|        1197|        2050
    RTD|           1|        1311|        2107
    RTD|           0|         627|        1822
    RTD|           2|        1250|        3247
    RTD|           3|        1254|        3304
    RTD|           1|        1254|        3361
    RTD|           2|        1254|        4501
    RTD|           1|        1254|        4615
    RTD|           0|         684|        2506
    RTD|           3|        1311|        4615
    RTD|           3|        1256|        5871
    RTD|           2|        1311|        5812
    RTD|           0|         684|        3190
    RTD|           1|        1311|        5926
    ...
    

    Unit testing

    A series of unit testing programs is produced in $prefix/tests as part of building libevl. You should run each of them to make sure everything is fine. The simplest way to do this is as follows:

    Running the EVL unit tests

    # evl test
    duplicate-element: OK
    monitor-pp-dynamic: OK
    monitor-pi: OK
    clone-fork-exec: OK
    clock-timer-periodic: OK
    poll-close: OK
    sem-wait: OK
    monitor-pp-raise: OK
    monitor-pp-tryenter: OK
    heap-torture: OK
    monitor-pp-lower: OK
    poll-read: OK
    monitor-deadlock: OK
    monitor-wait-multiple: OK
    monitor-event: OK
    proxy-eventfd: OK
    monitor-flags.eshi: OK
    monitor-wait-multiple.eshi: OK
    sem-wait.eshi: OK
    detach-self.eshi: OK
    sem-timedwait.eshi: OK
    proxy-pipe.eshi: OK
    clock-timer-periodic.eshi: OK
    proxy-eventfd.eshi: OK
    monitor-event.eshi: OK
    heap-torture.eshi: OK
    poll-sem.eshi: OK
    poll-nested.eshi: OK
    sem-close-unblock: OK
    monitor-steal: OK
    basic-xbuf: OK
    simple-clone: OK
    monitor-flags: OK
    poll-sem: OK
    sem-timedwait: OK
    mapfd: OK
    proxy-pipe: OK
    poll-flags: OK
    poll-nested: OK
    monitor-pp-pi: OK
    fault: OK
    monitor-pi-deadlock: OK
    detach-self: OK
    monitor-pp-nested: OK
    monitor-pp-weak: OK
    stax-lock: OK
    fpu-preload: OK
    

    Last modified: Fri, 24 Jan 2020 12:45:23 CET